Christian Minimalism

Counter-Cultural Living: Sabbath and What Matters Most

Here at Christian Minimalism, we have most recently been looking at how living as a Christian minimalist is counter-cultural. Our theme verse has been:

Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your minds, so that you may discern what is the will of God—what is good and acceptable and perfect.” (Romans 12:2)

We are called to live differently than society’s accepted lifestyle.

In the first part of our three-part series, we explored the practical aspects of intentional consumption and living with less. In the second part, we looked at how we can practically live into our vocation and identity in God through counter-cultural living. This time, in our third part, we will explore some practical ways to make room for Sabbath rest and what matters most!

A FRIENDLY REMINDER: It’s easy to assume that someone must do all the things listed below to be a Christian minimalist. Nope! Christian minimalists strive to serve God and others by focusing on the aspects of life that matter most, and intentionally removing everything else. This will look different for each person, depending on their life situation.

You are encouraged to read the practical tips offered below and in subsequent blog posts as suggestions. Feel free to incorporate those tips that speak to you in your current context. Experiment. Try a tip on for a while and see how it feels. If it doesn’t work, you can always stop and try something else. Don’t be afraid to try something new!

Let’s look at the third and final part of our series on Counter-Cultural Living!

 

Making Room for Sabbath and What Matters Most

In our culture, rest and time for prayer is counter-cultural. Time is money, and if time is not used to make more money, it is considered wasted.

Christian minimalists understand that Sabbath rest, time with God, and spending our time on what matters most is more in line with the lifestyle God wants for us. Even Jesus took time to do so.

And after Jesus had dismissed the crowds, he went up the mountain by himself to pray. When evening came, he was there alone. (Matthew 14:23)

Here are some ways we can better prioritize rest and spiritual renewal:

  • Spend some time every day (even just 5 minutes if that’s what works) in prayer, reading Scripture, and listening for God’s voice. We are better able to hear God when we make it a practice to listen.
  • Carve out some Sabbath time in which you not only don’t work, but also don’t think about work. Ideally, this would be a full day every week, but it can also be a half-day or a few hours.
  • Have at least one time a week to spend time with loved ones with your undivided attention.
  • Assess your use of technology and see if maybe doing short-term technology or social media fasts could help in spending quality time with God and loved ones.
  • Worship , praise, and thank God regularly, both communally and in private.
  • Cultivate gratitude for what God has given you, and being content with what you have.
  • Say no to time-sucking activities that God isn’t calling you to and don’t add value to your life.

 

Living counter-culturally as a Christian minimalist isn’t always easy, but it is always worth it. Which of these practical tips spoke to you? What can you try out today?

 

 

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About 
Becca Ehrlich, AKA The Christian Minimalist, is striving to be a Christian minimalist in a consumer society. She currently lives in Philadelphia, PA with her husband Will. You can read more about her story and how her blog came to exist by clicking the website link above.

1 Comment

  1. Gale

    August 14, 2019 - 11:24 am
    Reply

    I took a screen shot of your ideas, and will print it out and keep it near, for future reference. I hope your discernment is going well. It was great to see Will.

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